team merchandising had a simple solution?

(This concept comes from Dave Meluni’s Sports Management class at the University of Syracuse. The students who presented this idea as part of the “Brand Food University” Program are: Connor Davis, Dean Vergos, Ben Lehrberger, Robbie Duggan, Chris Nolan, Christian Owens)

 

BRAND FOOD UNIVERSITY CHALLENGE:

How can “Upset U” generate media coverage and drive sales using a single piece of merchandise launched at the NCAA tournament

 

THIRD PLACE CONCEPT:

Underdog U can generate and make national media coverage through one piece of clothing; team-themed bandanas. These bandanas will be worn by fans during basketball games and feature the team color scheme. The bandana will be effective because when the camera pans over to the student section or the general admission sections, the bandanas will be clearly visible whether the person wears the bandana across their forehead, across their necks, or its waved around like a flag. Another key component is that bandanas are not relatively popular among sporting events. It is not a typical piece of clothing fans wear to sporting events, it is an accessory. Therefore, the idea of wearing a bandana to a sporting event will hopefully be associated with Underdog U’s school if it catches on. Production of the bandanas is also very cheap as it’s simply a single piece of fabric that can be sold for much more than its production cost, therefore yielding a significant profit if marketed properly.

you went the cowboy way?

(This concept comes from Dave Meluni’s Sports Management class at the University of Syracuse. The students who presented this idea as part of the “Brand Food University” Program are:Ryan Dilts, Phillip Walz, Hongkwan Park, David Chow, Zach Adee, Spencer Frybergh)

 

BRAND FOOD UNIVERSITY CHALLENGE:

How can “Upset U” generate media coverage and drive sales using a single piece of merchandise launched at the NCAA tournament

 

SECOND PLACE CONCEPT:

Our university, Underdog University, recently made the NCAA Tournament! The Underdog Desperadoes are located in a small town in Texas. Our concept idea is to sell yellow and black cowboy hats. These cowboy hats would resemble the one that our mascot, Danny the Desperado, wears. The popularity of cowboy hats in the region will get the local fans to buy into the idea to get it started. As the tournament progresses, the more people will see our team along with our fans. The bright yellow and black color scheme will draw the attention of viewers across the country as these colors are aesthetically pleasing. These cowboy hats will stand out when the fans are shown during the tournament games. Following each game, the “Hee Haw” chant between the fans and players along with the tipping of the cowboy hats by the fans will grab the attention of the media. The combination of these upsets, chants, the unique and bright color scheme, and the popularity of cowboy hats in the team’s area, will allow for Underdog University to generate and make national media coverage and drive sales.

you loved your “job”?

(Post Via Guest Chef Brittany Cohen, Pac-12 Networks and Golden State Warriors Game Operations)

Close your eyes. Take a breath. Go to your happy place.

Where are you?

Maybe you’re on a beach. Maybe you’re in a cabin surrounded by the snow.

Where am I?

I’m surrounded by 60,000 people screaming at the top of their lungs. We all want the same thing. Tim Brown in the endzone. Owen Nolan with a hat trick.

My Happy place? At the 50 yard-line, eight rows back, a hot dog in one hand and a half-spilled beer in the other. Surrounded by painted faces and “DE-FENSE” chants. I’m inside a stadium. It is complete chaos; but this is where I am most at peace.

Sports are my outlet; my breath of fresh air when I need it the most. It turns out, it’s genetic. My mom was just as crazy-passionate about sports as I am. She passed when I was seven, but some of my strongest memories from that time are my mom and I cheering on the Raiders.

To me it’s more than just a game, every game tells a story. I love watching teams grow from a group of individual athletes into a family. I love watching a team on a mission. I love that sports are my happy place, which is why I have chosen a career in sports.

Where are you?

you rallied your locals to build your brand?

*The following is an excerpt from the book Brands Win Championships*

Local community support is key in convincing recruits and families of those recruits that your school is right for their son or daughter. College towns are a big draw to athletes, but in order to create that college-town atmosphere, you’re going to need to get your community to rally around your program. Getting your team out and helping in the community is a great way to get the locals on your side.

While you’re winning over the locals at these events, make sure you’re passing out swag with your program and school represented, things like window signs, house flags, car flags, anything a potential recruit may see on a visit (i.e., not something that will sit inside someone’s house). Capitalize on that goodwill you have built with the local community, and give them the nudge they need to start visibly showing their support for the program.

 

you immortalized your greatest alums?

*The following is an excerpt from the book Brands Win Championships*

Number or jersey retirement ceremonies are great for a couple of reasons. First, it gives you permission to reach out to your fan base again while giving families another activity to attend that’s centered around your program. Second, it is very important to keep your alumni involved and feeling appreciated. We already talked about the benefit of professional athletes representing your school and your program simultaneously. The more you show appreciation to your alumni, the more likely they are to turn themselves into walking and talking billboards for you.

records were meant to be remembered?

*The following is an excerpt from the book Brands Win Championships*

Record-breaking moments can stay with a fan for life. But that level of impression is based on you and the experience you provide. Fans should walk away both recognizing history being made and feeling like they were a part of it. Your goal is to give your audience chills while at the same time showing your appreciation for the athlete who is breaking the record. If you have an athlete or team on the verge of history, be prepared. Have souvenirs ready to give out as people leave. Give them something to cherish the moment by, and they will never forget.

you celebrated the preseason?

*The following is an excerpt from the book Brands Win Championships*

Football and basketball are year-round sports for most of the country, which means you can get fans involved in these particular programs outside of the traditional in-season months. Midnight Madness in basketball provides an event outside of the season in which fans want to be involved. Make it an experience, if not for the product on the court then for the families attending. Make it something families look forward to every year. Give people a reason to attend outside of the desire to see next year’s team. The reality is the majority of your fans aren’t hardcore enough to care about a scrimmage featuring next year’s squad; however, if you give them added incentive to attend the event, what happens on the court becomes icing. Think in the same way when it comes to events like spring games in football or recruiting dinners and pep rallies, which cover all sports.

message boards are your allies?

*The following is an excerpt from the book Brands Win Championships*

You’ll never be able to control message boards, as many of them are managed by fans in the form of admins and overrun by bleeding heart subscribers. But, if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em! Message boards can be your best friend. Think of it as free market research. Befriend the admins of the boards you consider to be the most relevant in your community and partner with them. The reason is simple: you’re catering to fans, and fans are the lifeblood of your program. The more you know about them, the more likely you are to keep them happy. Message boards offer you a free focus group and a finger on the pulse of your fan base at any given moment. All you have to do is plug in that URL and start reading.

Consider this. If you’re looking to gauge fan response to a new, unreleased, uniform idea, your friends the forum admins can test the waters for you without giving away the farm. And they’ll do it just in time for you to react and tweak designs.

Similarly, if you have a new brand campaign you’re trying to make headway with among fans, create message board signatures (the banners you often see underneath posts of particular individuals) that the admins can offer up to their community exclusively. In a matter of days, your new campaign will be all over the internet, thanks to your decision to seed the art to your most rabid fan base.

I know this can work because as a die-hard Oregon State University fan and alum, I once volunteered my time with a noteworthy Beaver board and created school-specific signatures for the community. The response was great, and still to this day I see posts that include a signature I designed.

Message boards are your friends, not your foes, as many would assume. These boards are a resource to you. Market research is expensive; message boards are free. Use them.

your stadium restaurants matched your brand?

*The following is an excerpt from the book Brands Win Championships*

If you have the opportunity to affect the names of the restaurants in your stadium and the products they’re selling, use them to tell your story. If your program is all about flash, name the establishments and their products something that elevates that idea. If your program is all about being blue-collar, then keep the names within that theme. Have every fan walking around with lunch pails of food and thermoses for their drinks. Have fun with it! It might sound cheesy, but it works. Remember, it’s an experience for these fans and families attending. Every single opportunity to reinforce your message is crucial. Don’t let even the smallest opportunity slip by without your affecting it.